Elder Wilson

We would like to welcome Indigenous Elder, Wilson Bearhead into our Glen Allan Family!  Elder Wilson will be visiting our classrooms throughout the 2017-18 School Year!

Who is Elder Wilson?

Elder Wilson Bearhead is Nakota and a member of the Wabamun Lake Indian Band in Treaty 6 territory, Alberta.  He has served as a Chief in his community, the Grand Chief of the Confederacy of Treaty 6 First Nations and Alberta Regional Chief for the Assembly of First Nations.  Wilson has served his people for many years as a traditional helper in ceremony and community events.  Wilson was the cultural coordinator for the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) National Event in Edmonton in March 2014 and is an intergenerational survivor of the IRS system himself.  He enjoys bringing healing through stories, song and teachings to both Indigenous  and non-Indigenous people of all ages.  We are honoured to have Elder Wilson booked in one of our EIPS schools everyday this year. He enjoys bringing healing through stories, song and teachings to both Indigenous and non-Indigenous people of all ages.

What will Elder Wilson be doing during classroom visits? 

Story telling

Lessons and teachings will be adapted to the age, grade level and subject requested by the teacher as well as the length of time available.  Subject or focus could include traditional teachings, Iktoomi stories (“legends” of the Nakota), values/lessons or historical/lived experience teachings.  Curricular connections could fall under ELA, Social Studies, Health, Music and in some cases Science.

Culture, protocols and teachings of the Nakota people

Lessons and teachings will be adapted to the age, grade level and subject requested by the teacher as well as the length of time available.  Focus could include traditional means of survival and sustenance, values and beliefs, ceremonies and spirituality, songs, dance, and seasonal activities in traditional and contemporary Nakota families and communities. Curricular connections could fall under ELA, Social Studies, Health, Music, Dance, Religious Studies, Physical Education, Outdoor Education, Aboriginal Studies and Science.

 

What is an Indigenous Elder?

An Indigenous Elder is someone who is named by the Indigenous community as someone able to guide or share knowledge about their culture. 

Grade 5 Blanket Exercise

In 1996, the Aboriginal Rights Coalition worked with Indigenous elders and teachers to develop an interactive way of learning the Indigenous history most Canadians are never taught. The Blanket Exercise was the result; it has since been offered thousands of times and the fourth edition was released in 2016.

How it works

The Blanket Exercise is based on participatory education methodology and the goal is to build understanding about our shared history as Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples in Canada by walking through pre-contact, treaty-making, colonization and resistance. Everyone is actively involved as they step onto blankets that represent the land, and into the role of First Nations, Inuit and later Métis peoples.